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In
Iceland

All You Need To Know When On A Road Trip In Iceland

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Roads in Iceland

Icelandic roads are most often single-lane affairs, and in many places held together with gravel sections. The road quality is generally poor, with few street lights and little infrastructure compared to large parts of Europe and the US. One of the reasons for the poor road quality is the age of the Icelandic landmass. It’s the youngest on the planet in terms of countries, and there are still “air bubbles” inside the mineral needed to build roads. The youth of our landmass is pretty apparent when you look around and see all the frozen lava, which happens to be one of the worst substances to make said roads.

The road-signs are in Icelandic, and you’ll usually have to rely on understanding the image on the sign. Icelandic “highway” roads tend to lead right through small towns along the way, often right past the center square. As a result, you are driving through short sections of busy pedestrian areas. It’s sometimes hard to realize you are still carrying a lot of speed from your cross country drive, and you should make a habit of slowing down hard when you reach towns. Familiarize yourself with the most common dangers and oddities when traveling in Iceland by reading on.

Some video content, for the lazy

Driving in Iceland

  • By law, you must always drive with your headlights on, even during the day.
  • Everyone must fasten their seatbelts at all times. Not doing so can result in fines.
  • There is no tolerance for drinking and driving. The breathalyzer will pick up as little as one beer.
  • You cannot turn right on a red light.
  • Children must be in a child seat or a booster seat.
  • You should never stop the car on the side of the road unless you have to.
  • Park your car upwind. Both when short-term parking and overnight.


Driver’s License Requirements

Is your driver’s license valid?
If you have a license from the U.S.A, Canada, or the EEA (European Economic Area), your driver’s license is valid. If your license is from anywhere else, it’s only valid if it fulfills these requirements:

  • The driver’s license has a license number
  • It has a picture of the license holder
  • It has a valid date
  • It’s printed/written in Latin characters

If your license doesn’t fulfill all the requirements above, you’ll need to apply for an international driver’s license.

Road Signs

You might want to familiarize yourself with Icelandic road signs before you start driving in Iceland. They might seem a bit confusing, especially if you are coming from afar, and some of them you should know for your safety on the roads. At the time these road signs were designed, there weren’t a lot of foreigners around. And unfortunately, the road signs haven’t been updated much to make life easier for non-Icelandic speaking visitors. Some road signs have graphics on them and should be comprehensible, like a picture of a car driving into a river, meaning that there’s no bridge. The Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration (Road.is) has excellent information on driving in Iceland. Using the included tablet, we will show you how to use Road.is and Vedur.is (weather) to your advantage.

The Biggest Differences For Most

Give Way
Give Way

You yield to all other traffic. Very common in Iceland. It’s the only upside-down triangle, so you can tell from the other direction if others must give way/yield to you.
In Iceland, there is almost no intersection with “First Come, First Go” or a “4-Way Full Stop”. If there is no Give Way or Stop sign, we yield to traffic coming from our right, or if we are crossing lanes.

Roundabout Ahead
Roundabout Ahead

We always yield to those already in the roundabout, and the inside lane when exiting. Very Common.
Entering the roundabout (Yield): 
Outside Lane: When using the first exit.
Inside Lane: When you intend to leave on the 2nd, or subsequent exit.
Exiting the roundabout:
Outside Lane: Yields to interior lane, both when continuing or exiting.
Inside Lane: Has priority to exit.

Gravel Road Ahead
Gravel Road Ahead

Gravel Road Ahead signs are also prevalent, even on the #1 Ring Road. And when they say gravel, they mean gravel. It can be extremely slippery, and even though the speed limit says 80 on gravel roads (default max speed), that speed can be disastrous in certain conditions. Watch out for these, and slow down just a tad more than you usually would.

Forbidden Signs | Circular

No Entry
No Entry

You can not drive down this street from this direction.

No Traffic At All
No Driving

No driving at all. Not even a bicycle, from any direction.

No Parking
No Parking

You can stop, but you can not leave your vehicle.

No Stopping
No Stopping

You are not allowed to pull over or stop your vehicle.

Information + Warning Signs | Rectangular
Important

Title
Extremely Bad Road

In most cases, only usable by specially modified jeeps. Closed to CampEasy Campers.

Bad Road
Bad Road

Not all F-Roads are “Bad Roads” and not all “Bad Roads” are F-Roads.

Title
Unbridged River Ahead

Traversing rivers is only allowed on 4×4 campers and with Zero-Risk Insurance.

Blind Spot
Blind Spot

Frequent and shouldn’t be treated lightly. On single-lane roads, paying attention is vital.

Warning Signs
Triangular

Multiple Curves, First One To The Left
Multiple Curves, First One To The Left

Icelandic roads are winding. Keep an eye out for sharp turns.

Sheep on Road
Sheep on Road

There are a lot of sheep and horses (with or without rider) on/around the road.

F-Roads

F-Roads are mountain roads in Iceland. They aren’t accessible all year round and are often poorly maintained. The only CampEasy campers that can handle the large rocks, muddy tracks, and steeper hills is the Easy Clever X, Easy Clever, and Easy Viking. Always check Road.is or log into your Campeasy client area to see if the mountain roads are open.
The F-roads can be in a dreadful state, even when Road.is says they’re open. There can be large rocks on the roads, unbridged rivers, slippery mud, and snow, even during summer. The roads are most often narrow, and the edges wet and loose. Most bridges are one way and you should always slow down when approaching an oncoming car, the maximum speed allowed is often way too fast. In the winter, most of the F-roads are closed or impassable. In the highlands, you might not get cell phone reception, and the weather can be harsh, so make sure you notify people and have someone check if you’ve arrived safely at your destination at the correct time.
Please note that all off-road driving is strictly forbidden in Iceland.
We will provide further instructions and advice when you pick up the camper.

F-Roads in Iceland

Camping in Iceland


Since 2015, you can only park campers overnight at camping grounds, with occasional guesthouses and hotels that allow overnight stays on their premise. It is strictly forbidden to park overnight outside camping grounds if you are in an urban area. For shorter stops, you can park everywhere where there is legal parking, just like other cars.
There are camping grounds all over the country, and during summer you won’t have more than an hour’s drive to the nearest one, at the most. But if you are traveling outside the summer months, between early October and April, please check our segment on Winter Camping for more information on open campsites.
Below you’ll also find a map of campsites that are open during the Winter / Low-Season months.

Camping in Iceland

Maps of Campsites in Iceland

Summer Campsites in Iceland

Winter Campsites in Iceland

More on Winter CampingMore Maps

Gas Stations, Fuel and how it relates to your Heating System


Like all the nordic countries, Iceland has plenty of gas stations, more so in densely populated areas. Most of them are automatic (self-service) and accept the most common Visa/Euro credit or debit cards. In cities, you can find some gas stations that provide service at the pump. You will need to know your card’s PIN in most cases. The automated machines only accept cards that use a 4-digit pin, not 5-digit pinsGas price in Iceland is similar to the gas price in Europe.

WARNING: In the US, the hose/handle at the pump is green for Diesel and black for Petrol, but here it is black for Diesel and Green for Petrol. All our campers have a Diesel engine.

Keep a close eye on the fuel gauge when driving out in the edges of the country, where gas stations are fewer and further apart. It’s a good rule of thumb to fill up when the gauge reaches half. We don’t recommend you let the tank be below 1/3 when you park for the night, as the heating system is entirely reliant on the Diesel in the fuel tank.

Included in your rental is an N1 fuel discount card. It provides a small discount on fuel and allows access to the Wifi, but only where there is full service. N1 stations are the most widely spread around the country and the most common in Iceland.

N1 logo

Weather in Iceland

The weather in Iceland is unpredictable. It is hard to plan a trip many days in advance, especially during winter. You need to check the weather forecast regularly to see if you can keep your schedule or not. If you look at temperature alone, sure, we benefit enough from the Gulf stream that our temperatures are remarkably mild for Iceland’s latitude. During the summer months, the temperatures rarely go above 20°C (with mean temperatures around 10 – 15°c in South Iceland in July). In winter, it generally doesn’t go below -5°C. However, when you go more inland, like to Egilsstaðir in the east and Mývatn in the north, the temperatures can get higher and lower. But the wind, combined with intermittent precipitation, can make those -5 °C feel a lot colder. Even in high summer, there can be specific areas along your route that regularly see extreme gusts of wind. Enough to toss around a high-roof van. But then around the next hill, there’s barely a breeze. In your tablet (your Easy Guide), you can look up the weather and road conditions. We’ll show you how to monitor these maps, special warnings, and more when you arrive here at CampEasy.

January
in Iceland

In Constant Twilight

The winter solstice has just passed, and every passing day lasts about 5-minutes longer than the last. The sunrise and sunset come and go, making for a short but beautiful days in constant twilight. An excellent time to find yourself at popular tourist destinations in complete solitude.

January:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of thick socks.
- A thick coat. Maybe even two.

Rent:
- Shoe spikes at CampEasy. Or bring your own.
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
January
UPSIDES

Long Nights for Northern Lights

A lot Cheaper

A Lot Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

January
DOWNSIDES

Coldest Month

Rough Weather

Very Short Days

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
High: 1.9 °C (35.4 °F)
Low: -3 °C (26.6 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 5/5
Aurora Season: 3/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Shortest day: 4h 22m
Longest day: 6h 57m
Recommended
February
in Iceland
Time To Strap On The Skis

February in Iceland offers some unique experiences with the highest number of opening days in the ski areas. If you are into any kind of snow-sports it's a good time to visit. Tourist season hasn't started, and February is a great time to find solitude on the Icelandic roads. Rent skis or snowboard for the trip, or bring your own and mount it on the roof.

February:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of thick socks.
- A thick coat. Maybe even two.

Rent:
- Shoe spikes at CampEasy. Or bring your own.
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
February
UPSIDES

Long Nights for Northern Lights

A lot Cheaper

A Lot Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

February
DOWNSIDES

Cold Month

Rough Weather

Short Days

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
High: 2.8 °C (37 °F)
Low: -2.1 °C (28.2 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 4/5
Aurora Season: 3/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Shortest day: 7h 4m
Longest Day: 10h 7m
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March
in Iceland
Northern Lights Explorer

March is one of the best months to come and hunt the northern lights. The 2 "high-seasons" for the Aurora Borealis are in March/April on one end, and September/October on the other. And in March, it is still very dark during a relatively long night, making it ideal for hunting the elusive lights.

March:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of thick socks.
- A thick coat. Maybe even two.
- A tripod for Northern Lights photography.

Rent:
- Shoe spikes at CampEasy. Or bring your own.
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
March
UPSIDES

Great Season for Northern Lights

A lot Cheaper

Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

March
DOWNSIDES

Cold Month

Rough Weather

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
High: 3.2 °C (37.8 °F)
Low: -2.0 °C (28.4 °F)
Darkness: 3/5
Aurora Season: 5/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Shortest day: 10h 13m
Longest Day: 13h 29m
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April
in Iceland
Northern Lights, Oh Thy Glory

April is one of the best Northern Lights months, but the night time needed for Aurora Viewing is getting shorter. You are likely to get a more vibrant Northern Light show in early April. It gets a bit warmer, with temperatures rising to a 7°C average high at the end of the month. The Island is thawing and the environment changing, fast.

April:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of socks.
- A thick coat.
- A tripod for Northern Lights photography.

Rent:
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
April
UPSIDES

Great Season for Northern Lights

A lot Cheaper

A Lot Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

April
DOWNSIDES

Somewhat Cold

Somewhat Rough Weather

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
Thermometer Icon
High: 5.7 °C (42.3 °F)
Low: 0.4 °C (32.7 °F)
Rain Icon
Darkness: 2/5
Aurora Season: 5/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Shortest day: 13h 36m
Longest Day: 16h 48m
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May
in Iceland
Weather, Tips, and Recommendations

Nights are now short, snow can still be scattererd around, and visible on tops of mountains and in the highlands. Days are getting warmer, with occasional sunny days reaching 15 °C (59 °F), mixed in with regular cold spells. One F-road opens up, loads of campsites open, and most "summer" activities become available.

May:

Rent:
- the BBQ Unit, it rocks!
- a Toy

What To Read:
May
UPSIDES

Lots of Daylight Hours

Cheaper

A Lot Fewer Tourists

The Least Overcast

Many Campsites Open

May
DOWNSIDES

Somewhat Chilly

All the Weather Types

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
Thermometer Icon
High: 9.4 °C (48.9 °F)
Low: 3.6 °C (38.5 °F)
Reykjavík
Precipitation
Rain Icon
Chances of Rain: 30%
Rainfall: 61 mm (2.4 in)
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Shortest day: 16h 54m
Longest Day: 20h 04m
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June
in Iceland
24/7 Daylight

In June, we leave the Astronomical and Nautical Twilight behind, just barely dipping into the Civil Twilight in the "dark" of night, with daytime brightness round-the-clock. On the longest day of the year, Summer Solstice on June 20th, the sun is visible in the sky for 21 hours and 8 minutes. The snow is mostly gone, roads are clear, but F-Roads are still mostly closed. F-Road Openings vary every year.

June:

Bring:
- Sunscreen.

Rent:
- the BBQ Unit, it rocks!
- a Toy

What To Read:
June
UPSIDES

24 Hours of Daylight

Slightly Cheaper

Warmer Month

Driest Month

All Campsites Open

June
DOWNSIDES

24 Hours of Daylight

More Tourists

Reykjavík Average
Temperatures
Thermometer Icon
High: 11.7 °C (53.1 °F)
Low: 6.7 °C (44.1 °F)
Reykjavík
Precipitation
Rain Icon
Chances of Rain: 30%
Rainfall: 57 mm (2.2 in)
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Shortest day: 20h 9m
Longest Day: 21h 8m
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July
in Iceland
Highlands, Here I Come

In July you get the Icelandic Summer. The hottest month and the least windy, roads are clear and most F-Roads open. Get an Easy 4x4 and explore the geothermal-active tundra that is the Icelandic Highlands. Vast expanses of lava covered fields, no cell service, sparse vegitation, no inhabitants.
Want to bring a buggy?

July:

Bring:
- Sunscreen.

Rent:
- the BBQ Unit, it rocks!
- a Toy

What To Read:
July
UPSIDES

Lots of Daylight Hours

Warmest Month

Gentlest Climate Month

All Campsites Open

July
DOWNSIDES

More Tourists

Most Expensive

Reykjavík Average
Temperatures
Thermometer Icon
High: 13.3 °C (55.4 °F)
Low: 8.3 °C (46.9 °F)
Reykjavík
Precipitation
Rain Icon
Chances of Rain: 32%
Rainfall: 66 mm (2.6 in)
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 20h 48m
Shortest day: 18h 0m
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August
in Iceland
Highlands, Here I Come Again

Another excellent summer month in Iceland, with the best available weather. Roads are good, F-Roads open, and remote areas easily accessible.
We recommend having a small electric bike on the back for shorter commutes.

August:

Bring:
- Sunscreen.

Rent:
- the BBQ Unit, it rocks!
- a Toy

What To Read:
August
UPSIDES

Plenty of Daylight Hours

Warm Month

Gentle Climate

All Campsites Open

August
DOWNSIDES

Most Expensive

Most Tourists

Reykjavík Average
Temperatures
Thermometer Icon
High: 13.0 °C (55.4 °F)
Low: 7.9 °C (46.2 °F)
Reykjavík
Precipitation
Rain Icon
Chances of Rain: 39%
Rainfall: 89 mm (3.5 in)
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 17h 53m
Shortest day: 14h 39m
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September
in Iceland
Northern Lights In Cozy Weather

September is one of the best months to view the northern lights, with decent amount of clear skies. Short nights are still a drawback. The 2 "high-seasons" for the Aurora Borealis are in March/April on one end, and September/October on the other. Good weather for the most part, gets a bit cold at the end of the month.

September:

Bring:
- A tripod for Northern Lights photography.

Rent:
- the BBQ Unit, it rocks!
- a Toy

What To Read:
September
UPSIDES

Great Season for Northern Lights

Slightly Cheaper

Warm Month

Gentle Climate

All Campsites Open

September
DOWNSIDES

Expensive

More Tourists

Reykjavík Average
Temperatures
Thermometer Icon
High: 10.1 °C (50.2 °F)
Low: 5.0 °C (41.0 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 3/5
Aurora Season: 5/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 14h 30m
Shortest day: 11h 23m
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October
in Iceland
The Photographers Favorite Aurora Month

October is an excellent month to hunt the Northern Lights, especially the first 2 weeks. In October, days are short, making it ideal for hunting the elusive lights. Most F-Roads are closing but normal roads are mostly accessible. Some years we get snow, but not much.

October:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of socks.
- A thick coat.
- A tripod for Northern Lights photography.

Rent:
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
October
UPSIDES

Great Season for Northern Lights

Cheaper

Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

October
DOWNSIDES

Chilly

All the Weather Types

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
Thermometer Icon
High: 6.8 °C (44.2 °F)
Low: 2.2 °C (36.0 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 4/5
Aurora Season: 5/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 11h 17m
Shortest day: 8h 3m
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November
in Iceland
Back Again, The Long Night

Days are now short with intermittent snowfall. Some years there's plenty of snow, some there's little-to-none. Fluctuating weather, with plenty of both rough and calm days. Most roads are open, but none of the F-Roads. Northern lights aplenty and excellent opportunities for bargain deals and exciting activities to choose from.

November:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of thick socks.
- A thick coat.

Rent:
- Shoe spikes at CampEasy. Or bring your own.
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
November
UPSIDES

Long Nights for Northern Lights

A Lot Cheaper

A Lot Fewer Tourists

Winter Activities

November
DOWNSIDES

Somewhat Cold

Somewhat Rough Weather

Very Short Days

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
Thermometer Icon
High: 3.4 °C (38.1 °F)
Low: -1.3 °C (29.7 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 5/5
Aurora Season: 3/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 7h 56m
Shortest day: 5h 4m
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December
in Iceland
Join The Festivities

It is increasingly popular to combine a visit to Reykjavík with a few days out of town on a camper mixed in. Winter Solstice is on the 21st, with only 4 hours of daylight. Surprisingly, it's the month with the fewest visitors. Reykjavík lights up with decorations, with heavy use of Christmas lighting in most homes in Iceland. New-Years Eve is spectacular as Icelanders blow up their hard-earned cash with fireworks.

December:

Bring:
- Thermals and lots of thick socks.
- A thick coat. Maybe even two.

Rent:
- Shoe spikes at CampEasy. Or bring your own.
- Extra towels.

What To Read:
December
UPSIDES

Longest Night for Northern Lights

A Lot Cheaper

The Least Amount Of Tourists

Winter Activities

December
DOWNSIDES

Cold Month

Rough Weather

Shortest Days

Fewer Campsites

Reykjavík Average
Temperature
Thermometer Icon
High: 2.2 °C (36.0 °F)
Low: -2.8 °C (27.0 °F)
Northern Lights Icon
Darkness: 5/5
Aurora Season: 3/5
Min/Max
Daylight Hours
Sunshine Icon
Longest Day: 4h 59m
Shortest day: 4h 7m
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Mobile Network Coverage (Internet)

There are three major cell phone carriers in Iceland. Nova, Vodafone, and Síminn. There isn’t much difference in coverage between them.

With the internet becoming a larger part of our daily routines every day, it’s difficult to leave it behind when traveling abroad. To address that, we provide wifi through the included Easy Guide tablet and provide access for 700 ISK a day. It allows five devices to connect at the same time and where you find coverage, the equipment works well.

Mobile coverage is becoming better every year with the tourism boom, as it emphasizes the need for a more thorough network to cover the areas outside of the main population centers. Even so, we’ve still got a way to go when it comes to 3G and 4G coverage.

2G / GSM (Extremely slow internet or no internet at all)
Highlands: You’ll be able to find a 2G connection in a portion of the Highlands, but you might have to hike to the next hill.
Lowlands: You’ll have a good connection everywhere. (Almost)

3G (Decent internet connection)
Highlands: You’ll be very lucky to get a spotty 3G connection in a few places. Extremely limited.
Lowlands: Most areas along the coastline, but not all. You’ll find limited connections in some fjords, behind or on top of certain mountains and such.

4G (Very good internet)
Highlands: Not a chance.
Lowlands: Limited to larger population centers.

CampEasy

Easy Guide Internet Access

Included in your rental is the Easy Guide tablet